U.S. settles discrimination claims against North Carolina landscaping company

By Marian Johns | Jul 2, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Department of Justice (DOJ) has settled claims against a North Carolina landscaping company that allegedly discriminated against qualified, available U.S. workers by showing hiring preference to temporary workers holding H-2B visas.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Department of Justice (DOJ) has settled claims against a North Carolina landscaping company that allegedly discriminated against qualified, available U.S. workers by showing hiring preference to temporary workers holding H-2B visas.

The DOJ alleges its investigation of Triple H Services, LLC., found the company advertised for more than 450 landscape laborers in five states in a way that mislead U.S. workers about available positions and also prevented or deterred some workers from applying in violation of the Immigration and Nationally Act (INA).   According to the DOJ, Triple H allegedly prematurely closed online job applications for U.S. workers and filled positions with H-2B visa workers and did not make job postings visible to those seeking jobs using state workforce agency online services. 

“Federal law prohibits employers from discriminating against U.S. workers in hiring because of their citizenship status,” acting assistant attorney general John Gore said in a statement. “The department will continue to fight to ensure that U.S. workers are not disadvantaged because of their citizenship status."  

The settlement also includes Triple H setting up a back pay fund at a cap of $85,000 for compensation, pay $15,600 in civil penalties and start enhanced recruitment activities to attract U.S. workers, according to the department.


Want to get notified whenever we write about U.S. Department of Justice ?

Sign-up Next time we write about U.S. Department of Justice, we'll email you a link to the story. You may edit your settings or unsubscribe at any time.

Organizations in this Story

U.S. Department of Justice

More News

The Record Network