Latest News

Pennsylvania bindery company to pay back wages after alleged minimum wage, overtime violations

By Marian Johns | Jan 4, 2019

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A federal court has ordered a Pennsylvania printing and bindery company to pay back wages for Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) violations, including not paying minimum wage and overtime to employees.

FTC accuses 9 Canadian, U.S. defendants of scamming small businesses with Internet services

By Marian Johns | Jan 4, 2019

WASHINGTON, D.C. — An Illinois district court has ordered nine Canadian and U.S. defendants accused of scamming small businesses with Internet-related services to pay more than $4.6 million, according to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Buffalo bank settles EEOC allegations it put disabled, impaired workers on 'involuntary leave'

By Marian Johns | Dec 26, 2018

NEW YORK — A Buffalo bank has settled a lawsuit that alleges the corporation failed to provide reasonable accommodations to disabled and impaired employees by putting them on "involuntary leave" until they could have medical authorization to return to work without accommodations.

Feds allege Washington workers' comp law violations constitution

By Bree Gonzales | Dec 24, 2018

YAKIMA, Wash. (Legal Newsline) – The federal government is seeking to enjoin the implementation and declare invalid a Washington state workers' compensation law regarding the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the state.

Jury awards Florida farmworker more than $800,000 after supervisor's sexual assault

By Marian Johns | Dec 24, 2018

TAMPA — A jury has awarded a Florida farmworker $850,000 after the farm she worked for took no action after she was sexually assaulted by a supervisor, according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Louisiana credit union settles EEOC charges of firing worker who criticized racially offensive video

By Marian Johns | Dec 24, 2018

NEW ORLEANS — A Louisiana credit union will pay $110,000 to settle a federal agency's lawsuit that alleges the company fired an African-American branch manager because she complained that a training video was racially offensive.

EEOC: Georgia restaurant to pay $15,500 for demoting worker due to pregnancy

By Marian Johns | Dec 24, 2018

ATLANTA — A Georgia restaurant and bar accused of demoting an employee to a lower paying job due to her pregnancy, has settled charges by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Quality Inn, Country Inn & Suites, Ramada franchises settle FLSA violation charges

By Marian Johns | Dec 21, 2018

NEW YORK — Three New York hotels will pay more than $500,000 in back wages, damages and civil penalties over allegations of not paying overtime, time-and-one-half wages and for false employee pay record keeping.

North Carolina rehab center settles U.S. allegations of firing employee due to illness

By Marian Johns | Dec 21, 2018

RALEIGH — A North Carolina rehabilitation and health care center has settled a lawsuit filed by the federal government, alleging the company discriminated against and then fired an employee due to her autoimmune disorder and rheumatoid arthritis.

Sierra Club challenges DHS waivers for border wall as unconstitutional

By Gabriel Neves | Dec 20, 2018

WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) – Two organizations, one environmental and another that advocates for the southern border communities, are suing the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen over waivers of laws in regard the construction of a wall on the country's southern border.

EEOC alleges North Dakota restaurant fired server due to pregnancy

By Marian Johns | Dec 17, 2018

BISMARCK, N.D. — A North Dakota restaurant faces a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), alleging the restaurant fired a server after she disclosed her pregnancy.

Cato Corporation reaches $3.5 million settlement with EEOC over discrimination charges

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

WASHINGTON — North Carolina-based The Cato Corporation has agreed to pay $3.5 million to settle claims by the federal government that the women's fashion retailer failed to grant reasonable accommodations to employees who were pregnant or disabled.

3 South Carolina restaurants to pay back wages to settle alleged overtime violation

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina has ordered three South Carolina restaurants to pay 68 employees back wages and damages to settle claims by the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of minimum wage, overtime and record-keeping violations.

AriseBank former executives to pay $2.7 million for alleged cryptocurrency scam

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. — AriseBank's former CEO and COO will pay a $2.7 million settlement to resolve charges by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) of engaging in a initial coin offering (ICO) scam, according to the federal agency.

Nexstar reaches settlement over alleged price-setting interference

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Nexstar Media Group Inc., has reached a settlement with the federal government over charges the company illegally exchanged "revenue pacing information" in order to predict competitors' advertising prices that affected competitive price setting, according to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ).

U.S. intervenes in whistleblower case alleging false submissions to Medicare Advantage

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The federal government is intervening in a whistleblower lawsuit against Sutter Health LLC and its affiliate Palo Alto Medical Foundation, alleging the health care providers intentionally submitted false patient information to the Medicare Advantage program in order to receive higher payments.

N.Y. Subway franchise owner settles charges of manager offering teenage girls jobs for sex

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

NEW YORK — The owner/operator of several upstate New York Subway franchises has settled a lawsuit filed by a federal agency alleging one of its former managers texted teenage girls job offers in exchange for sex.

Goodwill Industries settles allegations of altering employee time records to avoid paying overtime

By Marian Johns | Dec 14, 2018

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Georgia-based Goodwill Industries of the Coastal Empire Inc., will pay more than $100,000 in back wages to settle claims by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) that the thrift store chain manipulated employee time records.

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