Latest News

District courts divided on whether landmark BMS decision applies to class actions; SCOTUS likely to decide

By John Breslin | Jul 16, 2018

WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) - Federal district courts are divided on whether a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision on personal jurisdiction is applicable to class actions.

If woman doesn't consider herself disabled, how can it be sued for disability discrimination, Dollar General wonders

By Kyla Asbury | Jul 13, 2018

STATESBORO, Ga. (Legal Newsline) – A woman who alleges she was discriminated against and denied a job because of her disability is asking a Georgia court to deny the operator of Dollar General store's motion for summary judgment in her discrimination case.

From St. Louis Record

Jurors pound Johnson & Johnson with $4.69 billion judgment; Company vows to appeal

By John Sammon | Jul 12, 2018

ST. LOUIS – Jurors on July 12 handed Johnson & Johnson a body-blow, levying a total $4.14 billion in punitive damages and $550 million in compensatory damages to 22 women who claimed its talcum powder contained asbestos that caused them to develop ovarian cancer.

Calif. lawmaker kills bill that punishes lying lawyers after major donor opposes it, group says

By John O'Brien | Jul 12, 2018

A bill that punishes attorneys who mislead prospective clients passed California's Assembly with no opposition, but the state Senate won't even consider it. So, what happened?

From SE Texas Record

Calif. cities file appeal in effort to avoid possible lawsuit from Exxon

By David Yates | Jul 12, 2018

Potential defendants argue Texas court lacks jurisdiction.

Railroads avoid $6B Iowa class action over 2008 flood

By Erianne Leatherman | Jul 10, 2018

DES MOINES, Iowa (Legal Newsline) – The Iowa Supreme Court has upheld a district court ruling that prohibits a group of property owners from suing railways for damages related to a 2008 Iowa flood.

Bumble Bee Foods wants lawsuit over alleged tuna price-fixing dismissed

By Charmaine Little | Jul 10, 2018

AKRON, Ohio (Legal Newsline) – Bumble Bee Foods claimed in its motion to dismiss that an Ohio man suing the company over allegations it conspired with other major tuna brands doesn’t have a solid case.

After amendment, Boulder's climate change lawsuit headed to federal court

By John O'Brien | Jul 9, 2018

The City of Boulder’s decision to add new claims to its climate change lawsuit has afforded defendants Exxon and Suncor the chance to transfer the case to federal court.

Judge slashes attorneys fees request in Krispy Kreme class action

By Elizabeth Alt | Jul 9, 2018

An order was issued in the Superior Court Division in the General Court of Justice to grant the attorneys for former Krispy Kreme shareholders $150,000 in fees and denying the request for fees and costs associated with the litigation, noting that the attorneys are barred from recovering expenses according to state bar regulations.

Lawsuits do nothing to stop mass shootings, say those sued over Vegas massacre

By John O'Brien | Jul 6, 2018

Lawsuits won’t prevent mass shootings – they will only create a nanny state that still won’t deter the country’s sickest individuals from carrying out their attacks, says the owner of a Las Vegas resort where dozens were gunned down in 2017.

Others 0 for 2, but Rhode Island joining climate change litigation anyway

By John O'Brien | Jul 5, 2018

A judge on the other side of the country has ruled that it isn’t an issue for the courts, but that is not stopping Rhode Island Attorney General Peter Kilmartin, and the private lawyers he has hired, from suing the oil industry over alleged effects of climate change.

Rhode Island sues over climate change, using similar claims the state Supreme Court has already rejected

By Daniel Fisher | Jul 3, 2018

R.I. AG Peter Kilmartin better hope Rhode Island courts import California’s concept of public nuisance law, since the last time a Rhode Island AG tried this tactic, over lead paint, the state Supreme Court rejected the claim entirely.

Executives beware: Social media posts will make it into depositions

By John Breslin | Jul 3, 2018

CHICAGO (Legal Newsline) – As the country ponders if, or when, the most powerful chief executive in the U.S. will find the details of his tweets fired back at him in deposition hearings, business leaders are being warned over their own social media sense.

Court unseals scathing report accusing Labaton of misconduct in State Street case

By Daniel Fisher | Jul 2, 2018

A federal judge unsealed a lengthy report accusing Labaton Sucharow and a Massachusetts law firm of deliberately misleading the court about how it distributed the fees in a $300 million settlement with State Street Bank and Trust Co., including $4.1 million paid to a Houston lawyer who did no work on the case.

From Cook County Record

Post-Janus Landscape: Decision will impact union coffers, membership; more litigation on its way, say lawyers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 2, 2018

In the wake of the U.S Supreme Court’s landmark decision to declare unconstitutional forced union fees, the legal and political landscape will undoubtedly change. But precisely what will change, and how and when those changes will roll out, remains anybody’s guess.

As Facebook faces class action, likelihood of other platform companies being sued increases

By John Breslin | Jun 29, 2018

SACRAMENTO (Legal Newsline) - As Facebook faces a deeply damaging class action suit over its admitted sale of data to third parties, the potential that other social media and tech companies will be hauled before the courts is increasing in likelihood.

Insurers to feel brunt of New Jersey asbestos ruling, while Delaware hits employers on same day

By Daniel Fisher | Jun 28, 2018

A decision by the New Jersey Supreme Court forces Honeywell’s insurers to pay for thousands of asbestos claims even though the company, through its Bendix unit, continued to make asbestos-containing brake products for more than a decade after it could no longer obtain insurance coverage for such products.

Employer can't be ordered to pay for medical marijuana, Maine SC rules; Dissent says workers could be pushed to opioids

By Elizabeth Alt | Jun 28, 2018

The Maine Supreme Court has issued a ruling that a company cannot be required to pay for an injured employee's medical marijuana. The dissenting justices argued that this decision ignores what’s best for the injured worker.

From Cook County Record

US Supreme Court: Forced collection of 'fair share' union fees unconstitutional, violates workers' free speech rights

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 27, 2018

Compelling non-union government workers to pay so-called “fair share fees” to unions they do not wish to join violates the First Amendment speech rights of non-union workers and is unconstitutional, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled, finding in favor of an Illinois state worker who had sued to end the fees, also known as agency fees, in Illinois and across the country.

A closely watched climate case is dismissed; Will the others survive?

By Dan Fisher | Jun 27, 2018

The private lawyers who engineered the latest round of municipal lawsuits over climate change hoped they’d found a path through the thicket of precedents blocking their way by suing oil companies for selling hydrocarbons instead of burning them and by citing state instead of federal law.

The Record Network