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Newspapers fight Md. law on political ads; Attorney said lawmakers 'didn't care' about free speech concerns

By Carrie Salls | Sep 21, 2018

Newspapers like the Washington Post and the Baltimore Sun filed a lawsuit Aug. 17 against the members of the Maryland State Board of Elections and Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, challenging a new state law that imposes strict guidelines on publishers that publish political advertisements.

Hog farmers facing lawsuits, eight-figure verdicts worried judge will silence them again

By Daniel Fisher | Sep 21, 2018

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit is scheduled next week to hear arguments over a broad gag order issued by a judge overseeing a series of nuisance lawsuits against North Carolina hog farms that threatened to muzzle farmers and industry organizations opposed to the litigation.

From Pennsylvania Record

'A tipping point:' Punitive damages question to be decided in pair of Philadelphia Risperdal cases

By Nicholas Malfitano | Sep 21, 2018

PHILADELPHIA – A Philadelphia judge’s decree has paved the way for new trials in two Risperdal cases, in order to determine the applicability of punitive damages in those same actions.

Trump admin makes use of Medicare law in blunt warning to asbestos lawyers

By Daniel Fisher | Sep 19, 2018

In the Trump administration, at least, the government will no longer look the other way as asbestos lawyers negotiate lenient terms that make it easy for their current clients to get money at the expense of future claimants and federal entitlement programs.

From Pennsylvania Record

Lawyer thrown off toxic chemical cases had client pay six-figure punishment

By John O'Brien | Sep 19, 2018

More than 30 lawsuits blame Armstrong World Industries, once Lancaster’s largest employer, for exposing workers to chemicals that led to sickness, suffering and death. But they’ve been pursued by a lawyer who, a judge says, “made a mockery of the law” and whose clients are paying, figuratively and literally, for his actions.

Oil companies go for another win in climate change fight, ask for dismissal of Wash. county's case

By William Sassani | Sep 18, 2018

In August, lawyers arguing for a group of oil companies submitted a motion to Judge Robert S. Lasnik of the U.S. District Court of the Western District of Washington asking that King County’s climate change lawsuit be dismissed.

Want to know what opioid lawyers are up to in Texas? It costs thousands to find out

By Daniel Fisher | Sep 14, 2018

Some Texas counties are demanding tens of thousands of dollars to comply with open-records requests for documents detailing the time and expenses private attorneys have racked up so far representing them in opioid litigation.

DOJ raises flag in Kaiser Gypsum bankruptcy; Says it will investigate illegal conduct in trusts

By Ann Maher | Sep 13, 2018

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (Legal Newsline) - The Department of Justice has stepped into Kaiser Gypsum's Chapter 11 bankruptcy pending in the Western District of North Carolina over concerns that its reorganization plan lacks sufficient safeguards to prevent fraud.

Billionaire mega-donor Steyer picks favorite AG hopefuls; More global warming cases possible

By John O'Brien | Sep 13, 2018

Democrat challengers aspiring to become the top lawyers in their states have received financial boosts from Tom Steyer, a billionaire investor and environmental activist who some feel is a driving force behind the recent string of climate change lawsuits struggling to persuade judges to punish the energy industry.

Boulder fights to get climate change lawsuit back to state court

By William Sassani | Sep 11, 2018

DENVER (Legal Newsline) – Kevin S. Hannon, counsel for the city of Boulder and Boulder County, as well as San Miguel County, filed his argument as to why their climate change lawsuit against oil companies should stay in state court instead of being removed to U.S. district court.

Alaska Supreme Court rules to allow independents to run in Democratic primaries

By Sandra Lane | Sep 6, 2018

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Legal Newsline) – The Alaska Supreme Court affirmed the ruling of a superior court on Aug. 24 to allow registered independent voters to run for political office on the Democratic Party ticket in primary elections.

New Jersey man fights to keep his house, seeks reversal of $12.5M ruling in junk fax suit

By John Sammon | Sep 5, 2018

A New Jersey man whose business is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy and who might lose his home is fighting a $12.5 million judgment against him in an Arkansas court because of what he maintains was the innocent sending of a single fax.

From Pennsylvania Record

Philadelphia's appeal to plaintiffs crosses borders; 41 Dominicans file pesticide lawsuit there

By Nicholas Malfitano | Sep 5, 2018

PHILADELPHIA – Americans from all over the country have traditionally flocked to Philadelphia courts, to the point their plaintiff-friendly reputation has resulted in a “Judicial Hellhole" designation, and now plaintiffs are coming from other countries to seek their day in court.

From Madison County Record

Hale v. State Farm settles for $250 million

By Ann Maher | Sep 4, 2018

State Farm and plaintiffs have agreed to settle protracted RICO litigation for $250 million on the opening day of what was expected to be a long-running trial at federal court in East St. Louis.

California court reverses ruling in Pep Boys asbestos case; Decedent was a 'do-it-yourselfer'

By Gabriel Neves | Sep 4, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO (Legal Newsline) – A California appellate court has reversed and remanded in part a ruling in a case filed by the seven adult children of a Los Angeles man who passed away of mesothelioma.

Snowboarder whose leg was amputated after accident with snowcat appeals to California Supreme Court

By Gabriel Neves | Sep 3, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO (Legal Newsline) – A Saugus, California, woman whose leg was amputated in an accident while snowboarding at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area in Mammoth Lakes is appealing the loss of her lawsuit.

U.S. district court unseals action that criticizes selling faulty engines to military

By Charmaine Little | Aug 31, 2018

NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- The U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut unsealed documents Aug. 15 in a lawsuit that accuses United Technologies Corp. and its subsidiary Pratt & Whitney of selling millions of dollars of faulty fighter jet engines to the U.S. military.

Texas AG finds county violated state law in request for opioid lawyers' billing records

By Dan Fisher | Aug 31, 2018

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has found that a Texas County has violated state law by refusing to comply with a request for the billing records of private attorneys the county hired to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors

Defamation suit filed by alleged Roy Moore victim will stay in Alabama court

By Takesha Thomas | Aug 30, 2018

Court upholds lower circuit court ruling for change of venue from Etowah to Montgomery county.

Pittsburgh's hired guns move in on Philadelphia's turf as opioid lawyers jostle for power

By John O'Brien | Aug 29, 2018

The fighting in Pennsylvania among plaintiffs lawyers working on contingency fees has escalated this summer

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